MASTERY OVER SELF- DESTRUCTIVE BEHAVIOUR

Knowledge is a weapon. However, accurate knowledge is a better weapon. It is seemingly difficult to overcome a vice where little or no knowledge about the possibility of freedom is unknown.
As a matter of fact, we all find men and women, including adolescents, doing self-destructive things, at one point or the other. Behaviour is said to be self-destructive when it is harmful or potentially harmful towards the person who engages in the behavior. Self-destructive behaviours may be deliberate, born of impulse, or developed as a habit. They are actions that negatively impact our mind or body by the life choices we make. More obvious forms of self-destructive behaviours are eating disorders, alcohol abuse, drug addictions, sex addiction, self-injury, and suicide attempts, or a host of other behaviours that feel helpful in the moment but harmful overtime.
Self-destructive behaviours are basically inexhaustible and usually occur for quite a number of reasons. The major ones include: Childhood trauma via sexual and physical abuse. As a matter of reality, it does have deep psychological effects and imbalances on such individuals. Amongst other causes include disrupted parental care. It is generally caused by loss, pain, or other trauma, often occurring early in a person’s life. Self-destructive behavior appears in many forms, including antisocial, addictive and compulsive behavior, self-injury, neediness, and irresponsibility and tends to become worse if indulged.
Nearly all forms of self-destructive behavior tend to have a negative effect on physical health. Whether it’s not eating, overeating, self-mutilation, unhealthy sexual activity or abuse of alcohol. Not only is the physical health of such individuals threatened, also is the emotional health.
The following are possible means of overcoming self-destructive behaviours
Turn toward the problem: one of the biggest problems with making life changes is that we tend to avoid thinking about the problem. Look at the problem. Acknowledge it, and then you overcome it.
Learn to believe that you can: in the beginning, you probably have doubts that you can stick to this change. If you want to change your eating, you can’t change it all at once. It’s not realistic. Pick one change, and be specific.
Find support: Ask your partner or good friend, or family to support you. If you don’t have anyone supportive around you, find a group online.
Those with self-destruct behaviours can be helped if they have someone to talk about it. If it is noticed that they frequently engage in such acts, then there is an urgent need to caution them and if possibly stop them from doing so.